Status of World’s Women – Report 2011-2012

“Progress of the World’s Women 2011-2012: In Pursuit of Justice”‏ by UN Women.

By Myra Imran

Raising numerous serious questions regarding lacunas in the prevalent justice systems around the world, the UN Women launched its first major report titled ‘Progress of the World’s Women 2011-2012 — In Pursuit of Justice’ in Pakistan on Friday.

Presenting a comparative analysis of global statistics, the first major report following the organisation’s launch in early 2011, mentions that justice remains out of the reach of millions of the world’s women. It says Domestic violence is outlawed in 125 countries of the world but globally, 603 million women live in countries where domestic violence is not considered a crime.

Laws based on custom or religion, which exist alongside state legislation, frequently restrict women’s rights within the family, in marriage, divorce and the right to inherit property. “Much has been achieved in the private and public spheres in the last century. Yet discrimination and gender injustice remain prevalent around the world.”

The report says that 117 countries have equal pay laws yet, in practice, women are still paid up to 30 per cent less than men in some countries and women still do more unpaid domestic and caring work than men in every region of the world.

It points out that globally, 53 per cent of working women — 600 million in total — are in vulnerable jobs, such as self-employment, domestic work or unpaid work for family businesses, which often lack the protection of labour laws.

Highlighting another such dimension, the report says that by 2011, at least 52 countries had made marital rape a criminal offence. And yet, over 2.6 billion women live in countries where it has not been explicitly criminalized.

It mentions that in countries where there have been steep increases in women’s representation in Parliaments, progressive laws on women’s rights have often followed yet there are still less than 30 per cent of women in parliament in the vast majority of countries. It further mentions that donors spend US$4.2 billion annually on aid for justice reform, but only 5 per cent of this spending specifically targets women and girls.

The report also recognises the positive progress made and says that 139 countries and territories now guarantee gender equality in their constitutions but it also shows that too often, women continue to experience injustice, violence and inequality in their home and working lives.

To ensure justice becomes a reality for all women, UN Women calls on governments to repeal laws that discriminate against women, support innovative justice services, put women on the frontline of justice delivery and invest in justice system that can respond to women’s need.

It stresses the need to ensure that legislation protects women from violence and inequality in the home and the workplace and demands innovative justice services such as one-stop shops, legal aid and specialised courts, to ensure women can access the justice to which they are entitled.

The report says that across the board, existing laws are too often inadequately enforced, the report finds. Many women shrink away from reporting crimes due to social stigma and weak justice systems. The costs and practical difficulties of seeking justice can be prohibitive — from travel to a distant court, to paying for expensive legal advice. The result is high drop-out rates in cases where women seek redress, especially on gender-based violence.

The thought provoking and colourful launching of report was attended by a large number of women right activists, representatives of civil society organisations, lawyer’s associations and law enforcing agencies. Speaker National Assembly Dr Fehmida Mirza was the chief guest on the occasion.

Others who spoke at the event included Federal Ombudsperson for Harassment Act Mussarat Hilali, President Lawyers for Human Rights Zia Awan, AIG Islamabad Ehsan Sadiq and Country Director UN Women Alice Shakleford.

The speakers stressed the need for collaborative efforts to create an enabling environment for women in pursuit justice. They pointed out that enough legislation has been formulated in Pakistan for women in past few decades but the real issue is the effective implementation of these laws. They also demanded elimination of discriminatory laws.

Besides formal speeches made by the guests, the event included an interactive session with the stakeholders and poetry recitation by UN Gender Expert Salman Asif who read some of the very fine verses by eminent social worker Bilqees Edhi urging everyone to feel for women in distress and help them.

Another unique feature was the audio of inspiring stories of women survivors played for the guests. These women faced extreme forms of violence against women but were brave enough to fight back and become a role model for others.

Speaker Dr Fehmida Mirza said that no system can claim to be democratic and participatory if it fails to include and address the issues concerning its women. She said that women’s pursuit for justice stretches back beyond recorded time to the myths and legends told by ancient seers in all cultures and civilisations.

“Societies were always hesitant in accepting them on a par with their men. It is high time that we make our society realize that gender roles, inequities and power imbalances are not a ‘natural’ result of biological differences, but determined by the systems and cultures in which we live.”

She highlighted the efforts of Pakistan People’s Part to bring women in the lime light at every level. She said that in the last three years of its 5-year tenure, the women Parliamentarians ran 60 per cent of the business in the National Assembly and the government has passed 77 bills in which more than a dozen relate to women and children.

“Laws hold a critical balance in shaping societies although they alone cannot bring a change in mindsets. No government, no matter how democratic in nature, can bring about a revolution on its own if it is not backed by a strong and committed public opinion,” she opined.

She said that Pakistan will hold the seventh meeting of the Women Speakers of Parliaments around the world in November this year, where the women speakers will focus on making parliaments more gender sensitive. At the Saarc Speakers Conference in Delhi, she has also proposed the creation of a Saarc Parliament which could allow the Parliamentarians of the region to jointly address issues of social injustice, the speeding up of the MDGs and the realization of an equity-based gender-balanced mutually beneficial Saarc community.

Saturday, July 30, 2011
National Commission on the Status of Women-Pakistan
Government of Pakistan
Phone: +92-51-9224875,9209885
comms@ncsw.gov.pk
www.ncsw.gov.pk

Accounting for Muslim Backwardness in India: Going Beyond Sachar

Accounting for Muslim Backwardness: Going Beyond Sachar
By Yoginder Sikand

Introduction
As numerous studies, most prominently and recently the Sachar Committee Report, have pointed out, Muslims are among the most economically, educationally and socially backward sections of Indian society. Undoubtedly, the Report is immensely useful for understanding the magnitude of this problem, as are many of the suggestions that it provides for ameliorating it.

Critics of the Report are, however, not found wanting. One of the problematic aspects of the Report, as I see it, is that it has paid insufficient attention to the role of individuals and organizations that claim to represent the Indian Muslims in perpetuating the overall marginalization of the community, or large sections thereof, and of doing precious little by way of working to address it. The Report thus places the onus for addressing the problem largely, though not entirely, on the state.

While, admittedly, the state and its agencies do have a central role in both perpetuating as well as addressing Muslim marginalization, the responsibility and role of Muslim organizations that claim to represent the Muslims of India, and to be spokesmen of Islam, in this regard cannot be ignored. Unfortunately, the Report does not seem to give this issue the attention and importance that it deserves.

Muslim Marginalisation and the Role of Muslim ‘Leaders’
In the wake of the Partition of India, a large section of the then Indian Muslim leadership, consisting mainly of the landed aristocracy as well as the middle class intelligentsia, particularly in north India, where the bulk of the Muslim population was concentrated, migrated to Pakistan. The Muslims who remained behind were largely poor and illiterate, the vast majority of who belonged to the so-called ajlaf, descendants of ‘low’ caste converts, whose economic, social and educational conditions had not changed appreciably despite their conversion to Islam.

With their political influence, financial resources and access to new forms of knowledge, the landed aristocracy and, especially, the modern-educated intelligentsia could otherwise have been expected to play a key role in promoting internal social reform among the Muslims, as some of them indeed had in the years before Partition. But with their migration to Pakistan, this was rendered impossible.

The leadership vacuum created by their departure was soon filled by a different class of men—mullahs, representing a variety of rival Muslim sects, educated in traditionalist madrasas. Many of them, particularly of the Deobandi variety, had been close allies of the Congress Party.

Today, the vast majority of Muslim organizations that claim to speak for Islam and for the entire Muslim community are led and dominated by mullahs belonging to various sectarian groups—the All-India Muslim Personal Law Board, the All-India Milli Council, the two or more factions of the Jamiat ul-Ulema-e Hind, the Jamaat-e Islami, the Jamiat-e Ahl-e Hadith and so on.

Many of these mullah-led groups enjoy a symbiotic relationship with the state, despite the contradictions that sometimes emerge in their relationship. The state regards them as the authoritative spokesmen of Islam and of the Muslims, in return for which these organizations pledge loyalty to the state.

Ruling parties patronize some of these groups (in some cases, providing ministerial berths and positions in Parliament to their members, as in the case of the Jamiat ul-Ulema-e Hind-Congress alliance), in return for which these groups seek to mobilize Muslim electoral support for these parties. The relationship thus works both ways, to the benefit of both.

These groups make minimal demands, in terms of resource allocation, on the state, and this the state finds convenient. Often, their demands concern symbolic issues related to what they regard as Muslim identity: the protection of the sternly patriarchal Muslim Personal Law, permission for Muslim government employees to grow beards or for school-going Muslim girls to wear headscarves, permission to pray in mosques now under the control of the Archaeological Survey of India, demands for state patronage to Urdu, the protection of the Babri Masjid, and so on.

The state is very willing to concede, or appear to concede, at least some of these demands. After all, it costs parties in power little, if at all, in terms of resource allocation for Muslims, while by conceding some of these demands they are able to win Muslim votes.

The politics of Muslim cultural symbolism suits the mullah-led groups eminently, too, enabling them to present themselves among the Muslim populace as ardent defenders of Islam. It is on this claim that their popularity and the careers of their leaders rest. Furthermore, as in the case of Hindutva chauvinists, mullah-groups thrive on raking up issues that involve communal conflict, as the Babri Masjid controversy so tragically illustrates.

These issues are made to occupy the minds and energies of the Muslim masses in such a way as they come to believe that they literally involve the survival of Islam itself in India, in front of which bread-and-butter issues pale into complete insignificance. Playing on such issues and controversies, the mullah-led groups (like their Hindutva counterparts) are able to further stress and reinforce their claims of being the sole representatives of Islam and the Muslims, and in doing so to promote their vested interests that are linked to such untenable claims. By and large, their politics can be described as ‘the politics of agitation’. To be fair, though, to an extent, this politics is deliberately thrust on the Muslims by anti-Muslim Hindutva forces that thrive on raking up issues that pit Hindus against Muslims. This leaves Muslims and their leaders with little breathing space to tackle the massive internal problems of the community, being constantly forced on the defensive.

A survey of the demands that mullah-led groups consistently put forward and make on the state reveals that the pathetic economic and educational conditions of the Muslim masses hardly occupy their concern. Minor exceptions in this regard only prove a general rule. Instead, symbolic issues and those that involve contestation with other communities seem to be their principal concern, and in this, of course, they are a mirror image of Hindutva groups.

To be fair, this has to do not just with an innate conservatism of the mullahs, but also to the tremendous insecurity that Muslims in parts of India suffer from, at the hands of the dominant Hindus and agencies of the state that are perceived as biased against Muslims, which has only been further strengthened by certain global developments that are perceived as targeting Islam and Muslims.

Conservatism flourishes when a group feels that its way of life and its culture are under threat, and in such a situation, voices for reform take a back seat. Issues related to community identity, in this case based on religion, are then regarded as of overwhelming significance, while other issues are swept into the background.

In terms of their practical activities, too, the work of these organizations, by and large, is limited largely to religious instruction and preaching. The bulk of their resources are spent on building and running maktabs and madrasas and producing religious literature. Literally thousands of maktabs and madrasas function throughout the country, consuming the lion’s share of zakat, sadqa and other money given away in charity by members of the community.

The madrasas might serve a certain limited economic function, in that most madrasas provide free education, boarding and lodging to students, most of who come from poor families. They also offer them the prospect of a job as low-paid religious functionaries once they graduate. However, from an overall simple cost-benefit economic point of view, the enormous investment in the madrasas does not produce commensurate results. Madrasa students are trained in such a way as to render them (with notable exceptions) quite incapable of helping to address the manifold social, economic and educational problems of the Muslim masses. They are generally kept quite ignorant of real-world issues. In fact, although I will not elaborate on this here, by and large they tend to reinforce existing problems and even create new ones. As numerous critics have rightly argued, the education that they receive shapes their mind in such a way that in the future, as trained, professional mullahs, many of them actively work to hinder the development of the community, making it even more incapable of functioning in a plural, modern society.

Critics argue that the madrasas and their mullahs are, in large part, to blame for the backwardness of the Muslim community. Although the proportion of Muslim children who study in full-time madrasas and go on to become mullahs is relatively small compared to those who study in regular schools or do not study at all, as would-be mullahs they will go on to exercise an inordinate influence on the wider Muslim community, through the religious institutions they will man, the mosques in which they will preach, and so on.

The backwardness of the Muslim community cannot, therefore, be fully understood without critically examining the backwardness of the madrasa system that produces community leaders, whose influence is far greater than what their relative numbers might suggest.

The madrasas and other Muslim religious institutions that receive the bulk of community resources (and, in some cases, from patrons abroad, such as in the Gulf) generally promote extremely ritualistic and narrow versions of Islam. The Quran stresses active social engagement and exhorts people to help the needy and so on, but this socially-engaged understanding of religion that involves practical effort to address the real-world problems of the poor (as opposed to simply preaching about them) is quite in contrast to what many Muslim organizations propagate. Their work is limited largely to preaching, and rarely does it take the form of putting the social ethics of Islam (as they diversely understand them) into practical form in the form of projects for the needy and the poor. Preaching and publishing endless amounts of literature extolling (their sectarian versions of) Islam as ‘the solution to all the problems of the world’ thus substitutes for active effort to solve such problems.

Few, if any, of the mullah-led organizations run quality modern educational institutions or NGOs working among the Muslim poor. There are, of course, some such institutions and organizations, but, generally speaking, and notable exceptions notwithstanding, they suffer from lack of professionalism and internal democracy, and often just exist on paper. Like many other NGOs, many of them are little more than money-making rackets, and are generally rife with nepotism and corruption. They continue to operate in the charity mode, and thus their impact is even more limited. Typically, they shun collaborating with government agencies or with non-Muslim NGOs.

In part, this owes to deeply-rooted prejudicial views about non-Muslims and often unfounded suspicions about the intentions of agencies of the state. This naturally has a seriously deleterious impact on their efficiency.

The fact of the matter remains that the enormous, indeed overwhelming, focus of these organizations on religion- and identity-related issues (narrowly defined), to the relative neglect of the pathetic economic and educational problems of the Muslim masses, is definitely linked to their leaders’ worldly interests. This is because their authority rests on their claim of being spokesmen of Islam, a claim that, needless to say, is deeply contested by others. Constantly raising and playing on these issues, and diverting the scarce resources of the community largely to setting up religious institutions helps shore up their authority.

Critics are not wanting who argue that such leaders have a vested interest in keeping Muslims economically and educationally backward, and that in this, an obsessive concern with religious identity plays a key role, because it is on that basis alone that they can thrive.

More can be said about the priorities of Muslim religious leaders (with some notable exceptions) that reflect the privileging of cultural, symbolic and what are regarded as religious concerns over the material, real-world problems of the Muslim masses, but I shall stop here. I think by now it should be clear that the Muslim religious leadership (with some significant exceptions) has done precious little to address the manifold social and educational problems of the Muslim masses.

In the discourse of some of these ideologues, Muslim backwardness is routinely projected as primarily the result of state neglect or discrimination. Hence, the onus of addressing Muslim backwardness is placed mainly on the shoulders of the state. Some even go to the extent of claiming that Muslim backwardness is the result of what they allege to be a global conspiracy of non-Muslims to dis-empower Muslims.

It is true, of course, that anti-Muslim discrimination does exist, including among sections of the agencies of the state. It is also true that some non-Muslims, including and especially those who share the Hindutva view of the world, might well want to reduce Muslims to the status of the new ‘untouchables’. But to claim that Muslim backwardness is entirely, or even mostly, a result of the evil machinations of the state and non-Muslims, as is sometimes alleged, is completely unfair.

Besides, it completely and very conveniently absolves Muslims, particularly their self-styled leaders, of their own responsibility in addressing and doing something practical about addressing the issue of Muslim backwardness.

Somewhat the same can be said about Muslim political leaders (with notable exceptions) as what I have said about religious leaders. Almost all Muslim politicians are handpicked by various political parties, and many of them have absolutely no connection or involvement with the grass-roots. Often, their sole function is simply to garner Muslim votes for their parties, which are non-Muslim-, mostly ‘upper’ caste-Hindu-, dominated. They are answerable to their parties rather than to their Muslim voters. Elected from constituencies that have non-Muslims as well, naturally there is a limit on what they can do, even if they so wanted, for their Muslim voters.

Appearing ‘too concerned’ about their Muslim voters could well cost them dear, rousing the opposition of non-Muslims in their constituency or in their party, who might be quick to brand such concern as ‘Muslim communalism’. Like many mullahs, many Muslim politicians, their Muslim critics argue, have a vested interest in keeping Muslims backward and in the politics of symbolism and agitation, for it is in this way that they can project and reinforce their claims of being ‘leaders’ of the community.

In the years leading up to the Partition of India, a significant middle-class intelligentsia had emerged, which played a central role in promoting internal social reforms. The migration of a sizeable section of this class to Pakistan proved to be a major set back to this effort.

The overall backwardness of Muslims, especially in north India, owes also to the relative absence of a forward-looking, liberal middle-class which could otherwise have taken the lead in promoting social change and establishing institutions and organizations for this purpose.

In recent years, a small Muslim middle-class has emerged in pockets in the north, but, owing to various factors that I will not go into here, it has not played a significant role in this regard. It would be instructive to make a comparative study of the role of the Muslim middle-class in the north with its counterpart in the south, in states like Tamil Nadu and Kerala, where the situation is quite different. Although important centres for modern learning that cater mainly to Muslims exist in the north, such as the Aligarh Muslim University and the Jamia Millia Islamia, they have done little to address the pathetic social and economic conditions of the Muslim masses. Why this has been the case I leave it to you to think about.

Likewise, the Muslim press (with some exceptions) has performed dismally in articulating the social, economic and educational problems of the Muslim masses. Muslim-owned papers often go along with Muslim religious and political leaders in thriving on the politics of agitation and communal symbolism. This, too, is a subject that calls for detailed analysis. The same is true for the many Muslim publishing houses that exist. Most of them specialize in producing religious literature of the preachy sort, and hardly any of them have produced any serious empirically-based studies on the manifold social, economic and educational problems of the Muslim masses.

The neglect that these issues continue to suffer at the hands of the Muslim leadership is evident from the fact that there is not single Muslim-run research centre in the whole of India devoted to serious empirically-grounded social science research on Muslim issues. In contrast, there are literally thousands of what are called ‘Islamic research centres’ devoted to studies on Islamic texts, which bring out enormous amounts of literature on the subject. This is a sign of a certain socially disengaged vision of religion, which I had mentioned earlier, seems to be dominant, although it is rightly critiqued by many as ritualistic, polemical and sectarian.

The vast majority of the Indian Muslims belong to the so-called low castes. At least half the Indian Muslim population are women. Yet, the religious and political leadership of the Indian Muslims continues to be almost wholly male, and these ‘leaders’ are also greatly disproportionately from the so-called ashraf castes that claim foreign descent.

The manifold problems specific to the ‘low’ caste Muslims have, in part, to do with ashraf Muslim domination; and the continued marginalization of Muslim women, with Muslim patriarchy. Typically, ashraf male leaders have remained indifferent and insensitive to the empowerment of these two sections, who together form the vast majority of the Indian Muslim population. It is not difficult to understand why. Seriously addressing their concerns and promoting efforts to empower these most vulnerable sections of the Muslims would naturally threaten to undermine the vested interests of the ashraf male ‘leaders’.

In this presentation, I have sought to outline some crucial internal factors for the overall marginalization of the Indian Muslims that the Sachar Committee Report has, in my mind, either overlooked or not paid sufficient attention to. I have identified some aspects of the Indian Muslim leadership that are clearly responsible, in part, for the continued backwardness of the Muslims of India as a whole. By identifying some salient aspects of the Indian Muslim leadership that must be taken into account in order to understand the causes of continued Muslim backwardness, I am not unmindful of other causes for this predicament: the discriminatory role of the state, for instance, or Hindutva chauvinism, and so on.

Naturally, I have made broad generalizations in my analysis that may not be applicable in every case. Not all Muslim religious leaders are obscurantist; not all Muslim politicians are indifferent to their constituencies; not all Muslim-run organizations are inefficient; and not all ashraf Muslim male leaders are wholly opposed to women’s education or to the empowerment of ‘low’ caste Muslims. Certainly, there are Muslim religious and political that are indeed engaged in addressing the enormous social, economic and educational problems of the Muslim masses, but, the fact remains, these are more the exception than the rule.

Further, the situation varies across region and ethnicity. The situation in parts of southern and western India is quite different and far less discouraging than in much of the north and east, where the bulk of the Muslims are concentrated. The situation in the non-Hindi/Urdu belt might be, in some cases, more promising than in the north. But, I think, the tendencies I have tried to identify here are sufficiently prominent to justify these generalizations. Each of the issues I have raised could be the subject of a detailed book-length study, and I do hope other researchers would be sufficiently enthused to take up this task.

ysikand@yahoo.com

From SPN Newsletter

Baluchistan 2010: Chronology of atrocities carried out by Pakistan Govt

The following is a detailed report compiled by a community-based organization on human rights violations against Baloch people in Pakistan and Iran. The report provides most valuable information, in a chronological order, for human rights activists around the world.
It is our hope that SAAGAR.ORG will also provide us with a detailed report on atrocities against Baloch women carried out by prevalent Baloch value systems.

January 2010
3rd:
Three Balochs, namely Saeed Kardi, Abdul Jalil Mir Balochzai and Jabir Yarmohammedzai were abducted from Kash, Iranian Occupied Balochistan.
4th:
The Voice for Missing Baloch Person and family members have besieged the Balochistan Assembly. As a protest against illegal disappearances.
7th:
Eight Balochs have been killed in an indiscriminate firing incident in Hassan Lashkari Village (a Baloch populated area) in Karachi by a militant ally of Pakistan government M.Q.M. Family members of the murdered men encircled the Sindh CM house. And more than 50 Balochs were arrested after theses incidents.
11th:
Committee of Balochistan Human Rights Activists in [Iran] has reported that A number of political prisoners sentenced to death in Balochistan. The group said that the accurate number of people sentence to death is not available but it is believed that dozens Baloch have been awarded sentences.
Few of them were:
– Abdul Rahman Naruee S/O Khalqdad
– Abed Gwahramzahi
– Abdul Hamid Regi S/O Azaad Regi
– Abduljalil Regi S/O Jan Mohammad Regi
– Nasser S/O Shahbaksh
– Mahmoud Regi S/O Nazar
15th:
Three Balochs were injured due to the indiscriminate firing of Coast Guards of Pakistan near Pishkan’s coastal area.
15th:
Pakistani FC (frontier Corps) have open indiscriminate fire on a peaceful rally of Baloch National Front (BNF) as a result two BSO (Azaad) members have been killed and several others seriously injured. The seriously injured Baloch activists Liaqat Baloch, Zafar Baloch, Inayat Baloch and Farid Baloch have been shifted to hospital for immediate treatment. The Martyred Baloch students have been named as Ali Dost Baloch and Sadam Baloch (who is said be only 14 years old) . The Baloch students were protesting against the killings of innocent Baloch in Karachi. BNF had given the call for wheel jam and shutter down strike on 15 January.
21st:
Balochistan Human Rights activists Associations (Iranian occupied Balochistan) have reported that a 26 year old Baloch activist Mr Allah Nazar Baloch has been executed in the City of Khash prison.
23rd:
Khodayar Rahmat-Zehi-Shahnavazi, 35, executed by Iran after spending 4 years in prison.
25th:
The Pakistan government decided to build a Naval Base in one of the historical regions of Gwader known as“KALMAT CHUNDI HORE”, 30,000 Kilometers area of the said region have been included to the map of Naval Base. A large number of residents of the region had to shift to other locations because of the government’s decision; thousands of fishermen lost their jobs as their work areas were occupied by Pakistan Navy.
25th:
BSO (Azaad) students attacked in Punjab Sahiwal.

February 2010
2nd:
Quetta: Mother of Shah Nawaz Marri in press conference revealed that her son has been abducted by Pakistani intelligence agencies at gun point.
2nd:
Baloch Human Right Council of [Canada] wrote a letter to Mr Ban Ki Moon the secretary General of the UN regarding the human rights abuses in Balochistan.
3rd:
Turbat/Pasni: High schools Blangor students took to streets against the drug dealers in Pasni and adjourning areas. The police baton charged and shot live rounds to disperse the demonstrations injuring 3 students.
4th:
Makuran: – A complete shutter-down and Wheel jam strike was observed in Kech (Makran) belt of Balochistan on Thursday on B.N.F.’s call against Frontier Corps (FC) check posts and delay in recovery & release of Baloch abducted persons, and forced allotment of Baloch peoples’ lands to Pakistan Navy in Ormara’s Kalmat region.
5th:
Wadh:The management of a hotel in Wadh were harassed and physical violence was committed against the workers by Pakistan army for asking the head of the convoy to pay the bill.
5th:
Quetta: In separate press statements the relatives of Attaullah Baloch, Qabeer Baloch, Mushtaq Baloch, Ali Asghar Bangulzai Baloch and Zakir Majeed Baloch have expressed grave fear that their loved one might have been harmed “physically eliminated” by the Pakistani intelligence agencies (MI and ISI).
5th:
Asian Human Rights Commission reported that the life of Zakir Majeed, Central Vice Chairman BSO Azaad is in extreme danger in the torture cells of Pakistan.
5th:
Mand: Pakistan army raided the house of Martyred Leader Ghulaam Muhammed and took his family hostage and harassed them.
9th:
Quetta: Baloch National Voice, a Baloch pro-independent organization complied and released a graphic list of 1086 Baloch abducted political activists.
9th:
Interfaith International, representing Baloch issue in United Nations was suspended.
13th:
A complete wheel jam and shutter down strike was observed in several cities of Balochistan including Kalat, Mastung, Kadh-Kocha, Mongchar and other areas on B.N.F.’s call against illegal abductions and harassment of Baloch students.
15th:
Members of B.S.O. (Azaad) Waseem Baloch and Najeeb Baloch were nominated to be involved in a bomb blast by a Major of Pakistan army without substantial evidence to support his claim.
18th:
Quetta: Action Committee for affected people Gurandani, darbela South and North Sarbander Gwader Allah Bux Baloch, Mahmood, Nasir Karim Baloch and others requested international organizations to take notice of Pakistan government’s occupation on their ancestral lands.
19th:
Frail mother of BRP’s information secretary Mr Jalil Reki appealed to the UN, International Red Cross and Asian Human Rights commission to intervene and play their role for the release of thousands of Baloch abducted activists.
19th:
Noshki: Activists of BRP (Baloch Republican Party) observed a protest rally against the sentencing Haji Jhanzeb and Zufliqar to ten years each and registering cases against another eleven members of the party.
20th:
Students attacked in punjab.
20th:
Iran executed a Baloch prisoner, Haji Dadollah Moradzehi, after eight months of imprisonment in the city of Zahedan. Meanwhile, Ahmad-Reza Rashidi, the Deputy Public Prosecutor in Ahvaz, revealed sentences for 38 executions and retributions as well as 4 ruthless amputations in Ahvaz since March 2009.
21st:
Family members and hundreds of other Baloch women and children took to streets against the abduction of thousands of Baloch political activists. They protested for several hours on Adalat road Quetta and insisted to go the Governor House but the Pakistani security forces did not allow them.
23rd:
Pakistan decided to build a second naval base in the region of Gwadar, known as Kalmat Chundi Hore. 30,000 acres of land was set aside for the proposed naval base resulting in displacement of thousands of people.
23rd:
British parliament notifies and shows concern on the human rights abuses in Pakistani Occupied Balochistan.
27th:
The aged mother of Kabeer Baloch appeals international organizations to get his son released who was abducted in March 2009 by Pakistan.

March 2010
1st:
Central spokesman of Baloch Bar feared that Abdul Malik Regi will also be executed if the UN did not intervene.
1st:
Pakistan attacks a cultural event organized by B.S.O. (Azaad) resulting in death of Junaid Baloch and Sikander Baloch, injuring more than 24, icluding Ayub, Malik Zain, Zulfiqar, Mujtaba, Bilawal, Gul Hassan, Abdul Haq, Shahnawaz ,Jaasim, Ubaidullah,Zafar Iqbal, Noor Muhammad, Qurban, Lecturer Waqar Ahmed, SHoaib, Jaasim, Shakeel Ahmed, Saeed Ahmed, Waseem Ul Ghani, Umar Jan, Beebagr, Nasrullah.
2nd:
Pakistan security forces raided a village in Ghirsani area of Kohlu Marri agency in Balochistan, and open indiscriminate fire. Seven members of the same family have been arrested for refusing to collaborate with Pakistan’s authorities to exploit the natural resources in Chamaling area. The abducted men have been named as Hyrat Khan S/O Shakal, Shakal S/O Alihan, Raheem Khan S/O Dost Mohammad, Rasool Khan S/O Dost Mohammad, Imam Bux S/O Dur Mohammd, Allah Bux S/O Dur Mohammad and Muala Bux S/O Dur Mohammd.
2nd:
A complete shutter down and wheel jam was observed in Khuzdar, Wadh, Naal and adjoining areas against the Khuzdar cultural program incident.
6th:
Shutter down and wheel jam protest was observed all over Balochistan for the third successive day against Khuzdar incident on B.S.O. Azaad’s call.
14th:
Baloch, Sindhi and other International Human Rights activists came together to address a conference and to protest against Pakistan’s atrocities in Sindh and Balochistan, on the 13th Session of the Human rights Council in Geneva.
15th:
Over two dozens relatives of various Baloch missing persons started a long march from the Shall (Quetta) to Islamabad to press the Pakistan for an early recovery missing people.
15th:
Pakistan announced to sentence Banok Karima Baloch Vice Chairperson B.S.O. (Azaad), Saeeda Baloch, Saima Baloch and Peer Jan Baloch for five years.
17th:
Majeed Baloch (junior) was brutally murdered by Pakistan’s decadent security forces in Shall.
19th:
Turbat: Barkat S/O Mulla Ibrahim and Walid S/O Yousaf Baloch, residents of Zamran region of Kech district have been murdered by Iranian security forces’ firing.
23rd:
B.S.O. (Azaad) organised three days hunger strike in front of Karachi press club to demand the immediate recovery of abducted Baloch student and political activists, and against the illegal occupation of Balochistan.
27th:
Complete strike all over Balochistan and a protest was held in U.K. to mark the day when Pakistan occupied Balochistan in 1948.
29th:
Yar Khan Marri, Sikandar Marri, Bhawal Marri and Abdul Majeed Marri were abducted by Pakistan while they were on thier way back to look for thier abducted relative Murad Khan Marri.

April 2010
2nd:
Police and Coast guards combinedly broke into the houses of the locals in Pasni, arresting six people including a 18 year old student Saghir Bashir. The locals were harrassed and physically assaulted Baloch women. Others who were arrested were Nizam Nazar, Amir Buksh, Usman, Adnan, SherJan and Dilbar.
2nd:
BNM activist Mahboob Wadhela Baloch, son of Mir Abdul Nabi Bangulzai, Bohair Bangolzai abducted by Pakistan army.
3rd:
First anniversary of the martyrs of Murghaap was observed throughout Balochistan.
4th:
Military offensive in severeal areas of Dera Bugti including Mero, Shah Poor, Chattar Flanji, Suri, Khatan, Shahzain and Bandarag, where children and women were harrassed and assaulted by Pakistan army.
5th:
Family of Ghaffar Langov set up a token hunger strike protest in front of Quetta Press Club and family, friends and party colleagues of Mahboob Wadhela Baloch have demanded his immediate release.
7th:
Pakistan’s security forces shot dead a political activist Abdul Haq Samalani in Naal, Khuzdar.
8th:
Five Balochs namely Kamal Khan Marri, Laeya Marri, Lala Marri and Lal Mohammd Marri were abducted by Pakistan on Hazar Ganjo road.
10th:
A shutter down protest was observed in Gawader against the abductions of Baloch political activists.
10th:
Sher Mohammad son of Mirza Shah Bux Baloch was killed in Zahidan prison by Iran.
11th:
A Baloch journalist along with five colleagues was abducted by Pakistan army from Turbat.
13th:
Murad Khan Marri, who remained incommunicado for nine months and was brought into the limelight by the Frontier Corp (FC), disappeared again while in the custody of FC.
15th:
Two young girls, both sisters, aged 11 and 13, were severely injured in an acid attack in Dalbandin City, district Chaghai, Balochistan. The attack was carried out by Pakistan’s secret agencies to promote religious violence in Balochistan.
17th:
Iran hanged two Balochs in southern city of Kerman, named Feizollah and Nazar Baloch.
19th:
Baloch students were assaulted by a group of Punjabi students in Bahawalpur, resulting in severe injuries to Shabir Baloch, Raza Ali Marri and Shahab Baloch.
20th:
Pakistan unleashed a massive search operation in Baloch-populated localities of Quetta city, killing the mother of a Baloch political activist and rounding up around two hundred people hailing from various spheres of life.
25th:
Rahim Baloch was shot dead by police caliming him to be a terrorist and hence not providing any proves to support thier claim.
26th:
Quetta Police arrested 42 Balochs from Sariab area without mentioning the reasons behind the arrests.
26th:
Pakistani Military started a military operation in Talli and surrounding areas, near Sibi. Military poisoned the water puddles, looted of valuables from people’s houses and tryied to kidnap Baloch women during the operation.
29th:
Three little girls were victimised of acid attacks in the continuation of Pakistan’s policies to promote religious violence in Balochistan.
30th:
Mach region’s tribal and social leaders Habib Marri and Malook Marri were abducted by Pakistan army while they on their way to appear in ATF (Anti Terrorist Force) court in Sibi.

May 2010
7th:
Three Balochs were injured due to firing by the Iranian Security Forces (SF) in Talab Area.
7th:
Shabir Sheikh CCPO Quetta talking to newsmen after the inauguration of Police Child Protection Centre at Jinnah Town said the only solution to the problem of target killing “is target killing in retaliation.”
9th:
Torture cell discovered in Dera Bugti which is being supervised by Pakistan and holds more than 200 Balochs.
10th:
Farooq Mengal, 30, abducted from luck pass area by Pakistan army.
11th:
Farmers in Balochistan observed a strike against prolonged power cuts, due to which thier crops were destroyed.
13th:
The family of Zakir Majeed B.S.O. (Azaad) Senior vice chairman from Balochistan urged United Nations to take notice of the abduction of Zakir and other abducted Balochs.
15th:
The Pakistani Taliban supported by Pakistan army sent threatening letters to schools in Balochistan areas bordering Iran and Afghanistan, which has forced the institutions to shut down.
19th:
A shutterdown strike was observed in Balochistan against the arrest of Baloch students by the police from Balochistan university.
20th:
Baloch National Voice strongly condemned the Quetta jail administration and ATF for the mistreatment and torture of Baluch pro-independent leaders Wahid Qambar Baluch, Mir Qadir Baluch and Haji Murad Khan Marri.
21st:
Ishfaq Mullazai, 25, abducted by Pakistan army from Sariyab, Quetta.
21st:
Pakistan refuses to allow United States to open a consulate in Quetta.
23rd:
A so called judicial commission constituted by the Supreme Court of Pakistan refused to enrol the statement of Zakir Majeed Baloch’s relatives making an excuse that his name was not on the list of disappeared people.
24th:
Abdolhamid Rigi, a political prisoner who endured a long period of pressure and torture in Iranian regime’s jails, was hanged in Zahedan prison.
24th:
As part of the ‘International Struggle Week Against Disappearances’, ICAD held a very detailed and informative public meeting on the subject of ‘Disappearances, Impunity and Global Justice’ in SOAS University in London on Saturday 22nd May. The abductions in Balochistan were highlighted in the meeting.
24th:
Dr Naseem Baluch along with his two friend Yaseen Baluch and Elyas Baluch was whisked away by Pakistani security forces from Bolan Mendical College Quetta.
28th:
Shutter down protest all over Balochistan and a protest in Washington DC against the nuclear explosion carried out in Balochistan.
30th:
Police shot dead a political activist Naseer Langov and injured five others , as it fired on a protest against the indiscriminate arrests in Balochistan.
30th:
ICAD (UK section) marked the last day of “International Struggle Week again Disappearance” by holding a Vigil in front of Westminster Cathedral here on Saturday afternoon. The participants of the Vigil held pictures of force-disappeared people from different countries including Latin America, Colombia, Kurdistan (Turky) and Baluchistan.
31st:
Doctors and Para-medics have established a protest camp against the abductions and extra judicial killings of their fellow doctors by Pakistani government forces.
31st:
The token hunger strike protest of Zakir Majeed’s family continues for the 18th day for discovery and release of Mr. Majeed, a senior vice chairman of BSO-azaad. Meanwhile talking to newsmen the sister of Zakir Majeed Baluch has said that her brother was abducted on 8 June 2009 by the intelligence agencies of Pakistan from Mastung, Baluchistan. “The aim of our porters is my brother’s recover, release and to seek justice, but the agents of Pakistan’s intelligence agencies have started to warn us of dire consequences; they are threatening harm us”.

June 2010
1st:
Pakistani armed forces launched a massive military operation in Dasht and Gawader with the hardcore conventional forces, backed by Jet fighters, helicopters, tanks and armored vehicles.
2nd:
The Pakistani military has intensified its military offensives in the surrounding areas of Kech and Gwader. Military carried out a grand assault in the Mountainous areas of Dasht Baluchistan, including Talar, Katerinz, Saeyjee, Darrwar, Thump. Pakistan army’s fighter planes bombed the mountainous area between Thump and Blangoor which is called Gwanzag Koh. Villages and huts were affected by the bombings and hundreds of people were forces to leave thier ancestral areas.
6th:
A woman was killed and more than a dozen others wounded Saturday as over 80 mud houses were damaged in various areas of Balochistan due to heavy rains caused by cyclone Phet . At least 250,000 people are believed to be stuck in water in the coastal region of Balochistan. Serious diseases spread throughout the area as Pakistan did not allowed NGO’s to enter Balochistan for relief work.
8th:
27th day of Zakir’s Majeed’s family’s continuous token hunger strike camp in front of Karachi press club.
11th:
The former nazim of Kohlu district Kamal Khan Marri has said that his brother Sorab Khan Marri had been whisked away by the secrete agencies and has still not been released after lapse of 9 months.
11th:
The Baloch Bar Association boycotted court proceedings and observed a ‘black day’ on Pakistan’s Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry’s arrival in Baluchistan on Friday. The lawyers did so to register their protest against the court’s inability to recover Baloch missing persons.
11th:
Members of Baluch Students Organization Azaad Abdul Sattar Baluch and Bebagr Baluch were martyred and Mehrullah Baluch was severely injured in the area of Khoshak, Khuzdar due to an planned assault by Pakistan army.
18th:
Baloch Students Organization (BSO-Azad) burnt hundreds of Pakistan Studies text books in different parts of Balochistan and called for Baloch teachers to silently support the boycott by refusing to teach Pakistan studies.
19th:
Lawyers fraternity boycotted courts in protest against the abduction of a lawyer Munir Mirwari and threatened that if he was not released immediately they would go on indefinite strike.
20th:
Abdul Mailk Riegi was murdered by Iran without any trial.
21st:
The family members of Zakir Majeed Baloch, Vice Chairman of Baloch Students Organization (BSO), established thier hunger strike in Quetta.
23rd:
Hundreds of doctors belonging to different hospitals took out a protest rally in Shall (Quetta) and castigated the kidnapping of three doctors.
25th:
Balochs in Norway, Karachi and Balochistan protested against Pakistan on the International Day Against Torture.
28th:
Pakistan continuously refused to issue visa to the Asian Federation Against Involuntary Disappearances [AFAD] to go to Pakistan and meet with family members of the victims in Balochistan.

July 2010
1st:
Coordinator of Voice for Baloch Missing Persons, Shams Baloch was abducted from Luckpass area by Pakistan army while he was accompanying his mother for her medical treatment due to serious illness.
2nd:
More than 20 families of abducted Balochs staged a protest in front of Balochistan High Court against its unwillingness to take the cases of abducted Baloch.
3rd:
Baloch youth Faiz Ullah Baloch was shot dead by Pakistan army, and his companions Mange Khan Baloch and Bahadur Baloch were abducted from Hazar Ghanji.
12th:
Baloch lawyers observed strike in Quetta, Kalat, Mastung, Dasht, Surab, Khuzdar, Lasbela, Uthal, Pasni, Gwadar, Turbat, Panjgur, Kharan, Chagai, Naushki, Sibi, Dera Allahyar, Dera Murad Jamali, Usta Mohammad and some other parts of Balochistan against the non recovery of abducted Balochs.
13th:
Habib Jalib Baloch shot dead by Pakistan intelligence agencies even though he belonged to a pro Pakistan political party.
13th:
The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) feared that Iranian authorities’ intent to execute sixteen year old Baloch, Mohammad Saber Malek Raisi, who would become the latest minor to join Tehran’s death row.
14th:
Many shops which were owned by Baloch dwellers were set ablaze by Iranian revolutionary guards in Zahedan.
25th:
Najeeb Langov and Faizullah Baluch were tortured to death by Pakistan army.
25th:
Balochistan’s national newspaper Tawar receives threats by intelligence agencies, and its reporters were threatened to be killed if they do not stop reporting the human rights violations by Pakistan.
25th:
Ramzan Baloch, a member of Baloch national Movement was abducted from the Uthal area near to Karachi zero point by Pakistan army.
25th:
Interior Minister of Pakistan Rehman Malik admits that the Norwegian citizen Ehsan Arjemandi is held by Pakistan.
26th:
Ishfaq Mullazai and Farooq mengal were tortured to death by Pakistan army and their mutilated bodies were thrown at Qambarani road Quetta.

August 2010
5th:
Member of Zonal Cabinet of Peshawar zone of B.S.O. (Azaad) Tariq Baloch was abducted from Quetta.
4th:
Omer Baloch and Arz Muhammed Baloch Abducted from Quetta.
6th:
Two bullet riddled bodies of “Baloch missing persons” found from Brewery Road of Quetta. They were identified as Bahar Khan Bangulzai and Ghaulam Qadir Marri and were previously kidnapped by Pakistan army.
11th:
Baloch Day Celebrated in the European Parliament
11th:
Nazeer Ahmed Baloch, 25, was tortured to death by Pakistan army, he was previously kept in the secret torture cells of Pakistan.
11th:
The body of Azizullah Baloch was found from the bypass, he was tortured to death by Pakistan army.
14th:
Relatives of missing persons staged a protest demonstration at Manan Chowk of Quetta and demanded early and safe recovery of the abducted Balochs.
18th:
Sardar Nadel Jan Ghichki shot dead by Pakistan’s secret agencies.
19th:
Zaman Khan Marri abducted from Quetta and Tahir Muhammed from Koshak area of Khuzdar by Pakistan army.
23rd:
Pakistan army’s covert team named Sipah Shuhdae Balochistan threatens the Baloch outside Balochistan to stop their activities or they would target them where ever they are.
24th:
Baloch areas affected by Flood were struggling for survival as the international funds were only being spent on Punjabi populated areas.
24th:
Omer Baloch and Arz Muhammed Baloch tortured to death by Pakistan army, and their dead bodies were thrown in Qambarani road in Killi Barov, Quetta.
26th:
A shutter down strike is being observed in Quetta and several other parts of Balochistan o on the occasion of the fourth death anniversary of Baloch nationalist leader Nawab Akbar Khan Bugti who was murdered by Pakistan army.
26th:
Tahir Muhammad was tortured to death and his body was thrown in Khuzdar.
28th:
The Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC) shows concern on the inaction of Pakistan regarding abducted Balochs.

September 2010
2nd:
No way to tell which is worse Gaza, Iraq, Afghanistan, Balochistan , says Amnesty official.
2nd:
The Baloch Bar Association (BBA) observed a Balochistan-wide boycott to protest against the non-recovery of missing persons and kidnapping of two fellow lawyers, Munir Ahmed Mirwani and Zaman Mari.
3rd:
Bahram Baluch, a student of Baluchistan University abducted from compound of Baluchistan University, Quetta by Pakistan army.
4th:
Pakistan Army opened indiscriminate fire on a peaceful rally in Hub Baluchistan; as a result of the firing a 13 year-old Baluch student Mohammad Jan Marri was shot dead.
6th:
President of BRP Gawader Zone Arif Rehman was abducted by Pakistan army from Karachi.
6th:
International Voice for Baloch Missing Persons held a protest in London against enforced-disappearances of Baluch student and political activists.
6th:
Zaman Khan Marri tortured to death by Pakistan army, his body was thrown in a nearby town of Mastung.
8th:
Canadian Baloch step up to the plate to help victims of enforced disappearances
8th:
Imran Baloch, member of B.S.O. (Azaad) abducted by Pakistan army from Khuzdar. General public gave a strong reaction and RCD highway was blocked for several hours.
11th:
Ex Zonal president of B.S.O. (Azaad) Zakir Bangulzai abducted from Mastung by Pakistan.
11th:
Families of missing Balochs protest against the non recovery of abducted Balochs on “Eid Day”.
13th:
Ali Marri was tortured to death by Pakistan and his body was found where two other tortured bodies of victims of enforced disappearances arrived at the Bolan Medical College Hospital in Quetta.
13th:
The Tootak zone press secretary of the Baloch Students Organization Azad Asif Baloch, and his relative Zaffar Baloch were abducted by Pakistan army.
14th:
Two Baloch flood victims, including a pregnant woman and a child, sustained bullet injuries when personnel of Pakistan army fired shots in order to disperse a crowd that had gathered to fetch water at a relief camp near Badini Cross in Quetta
15th:
An all out military operation was launched in Dera Bugti and adjacent areas by Pakistani occupying forces with sophisticated weapons.
16th:
Strike observed in Balochistan on B.S.O. (Azaad)’s call against the torture murder tactic of Pakistan and enforced disappearances.
17th:
Dr Alla Nizar’s Appealsto World Community to pay attention on war crimes of Pakistan.
17th:
A Balochi music album by Hameed Sharif was banned and the albums were burnt by Pakistan army in Panjgur.
18th:
13 year old Saeed Baloch, assaulted by Pakistan army in Tump.
19th:
At least 0.2 million people of Dera Bugti and Kohlu, displaced after army operation couple of years back and got shelter in the bordering areas of Sindh and Punjab, are remain homeless as their makeshifts have been inundated due to devastating floods, reported B.U.C..
19th:
Pakistan-Iran Joint Military Operation in Mand Balochistan, two Balochs Tariq and Abdullah were martyred. The locals were besieged in their houses during the operation and many of them were harassed by the Pakistan and Iranian forces.
23rd:
Faqeer Mohammad Shawani abducted by Pakistan army from Mastung.
24th:
Baloch lawyer Ali Sher Kurd tortured to death by Pakistan army.
25th:
Pakistani security forces attacked the ‘’Ghulam Pirenz’’ village of Lehri tribe in Mastung area of Balochistan, as a result of firing five women badly injured, two got killed including a six months old baby. Security forces also entered in the houses , women and children being harassed and badly tortured. Dozens of houses, vehicles were set on fire, as a result all appliances and furniture completely damaged. The security forces also robbed the jewelries and cash money from the houses and shops. Number of cars and motorbikes taken away by FC, while forces arrested the 23 villagers and all shifted to the unknown location.
26th:
Commenting on the ongoing military operation by Pakistani and Iranian forces in the Western border of Balochistan, Doda Baloch warned if these forces spread their military operation to Eastern Balochistan, BLF will spread its armed activities to Western Balochistan.
27th:
Baloch Student Organisation (Azaad) staged a protest on Monday at National Press Club (NPC) to condemn the abductions of 8,000 Baloch activists, torture and subsequent murder of Ali Sher Kurd, a Baloch lawyer, writer and poet. The Islamabad based journalists boycotted the protest and used abusive language against the Baloch protesters. The capital police and journalists jointly tortured the Baloch students, several of them badly injured, later police lodged FIR against all of the student protesters.
28th:
The sister of Zakir Majeed Baloch after engaging herself for 139 days in hunger strike for the recovery of her brother has finally announced the end of their protest as she claimed that the hunger strike which was meant for the recovery of her brother and thousand others receive no approach from any state institution.
29th:
Indiscriminate firing of Pakistan army in Panjgur resulted in the death of a shopkeeper Ateeq s/o Dost Mohammad and a passerby kareem Baloch was injured.
30th:
Pakistan army did a house to house search in Dera bugti, looting the valuables of the locals and arresting several who resisted. While children and women were harrassed.

October 2010
1st:
Shakar Baloch and Sami Baloch, members of Baloch Student Organisations(AZAD) Khuzdar zone, abducted by Pakistan Army from Khuzdar. Similarly Sohbat Khan Marri and Arzi Marri were abducted by Pakistan Army from Hub City.
3rd:
Baloch Republican party’s former president of district Gwadar Ahmed Dad Baloch was abducted by Pakistan Army from Gwadar zero point.
8th:
Aslam Baloch resident of Makola-Kalmat some 80km from Pasni, was abducted by Pakistan’s coast guards.
10th:
A Member of Voice for Baloch Missing Persons, Yasin Muhammad Shahi Baloch was gunned by Pakistan’s intelligence agencies near Roshare Kalat.
13th:
A Central Committee member of Balochistan National Party Mir Noor-Ud-Din Meengal was murdered in Ghareeb Abad area of Kalat.
13th:
Massive Bombardment and Operation was Conducted over the Civilian Population of Mashkay Balochistan.
14th:
Pakistani atrocities were continued in Mashkay Balochistan,public properties set ablaze by occupying forces.
14th:
Members of Baloch Student Organization (Azaad)Gwadar zone Sameer Baloch and Yasir Baloch were abducted by Pakistan army from ‘’Surbandar’’ area of Gwadar.
16th:
In the region of Mashkay Pakistan army continued the operation where in-between 50 houses of Baloch populations were burned down and several houses were looted. Bashir Ahmed Baloch, a tailor and his two sons of aged 9 and 13 were abducted from Wahejo, a small town in Mashkay and school teacher Raza Mohammed Baloch, his relatives Adam Baloch, Aziz Baloch, Rasool Bux Baloch and Ibrahim Baloch were also abducted.
16th:
The son of a former city nazim was killed in an acid attack in Kharan, some 350 kilometres from Quetta.
17th:
B.S.O. (Azaad) announces to boycott print and electronice media on its biasness and silence on the Mashkay operation.
18th:
13 year old member of B.S.O. (Azaad) Majeed Baloch abducted from Khuzdar.
19th:
More than 24 Balochs injured or murdered by Pakistan’s militant ally M.Q.M. to divert attention from Mashkay operation.
20th:
UK Border Agency denied Hyrbyair Marri’s preliminary application for asylum in the UK
21st:
Zahoor Baloch, member of B.S.O. (Azaad) and Faqeer Muhammed Shahwani were tortured to death by Pakistan army and their bodies were dumped in the nearby areas of Mastung.
22nd:
Following the three day call of shutter down by BSO Azaad, the banks reacted very positively by closing down their branches in Gwadar on the 3rd day too. This protest was against the brutal killings and kidnapping of Baloch political and social activists by the Pakistan.
23rd:
The relatives and well-wishers of a missing person, Najeeb Qambarani, took out a rally in Quetta to condemn his illegal arrest, allegedly by the security forces.
24th:
13 year old Majeed Baloch, tortured to death by Pakistan army.
24th:
Three members of BSO (Azad) abducted from Karachi namely Tariq Kareem Baloch, Noman Baloch, and Yaseen Baloch.
26th:
Amnesty International urged Pakistan to investigate murder and torture of Baloch activists.
27th:
School teacher Saifullah Qalandarani and his younger brother Anwaar Ul Haq Qalandarani abducted from their home in Khuzdar by Pakistan Army.
27th:
Journelist Lala Hameed S/o Hayatan Baloch also president of Baloch National Movement (Gwadar Zone) was abducted by Pakistan army on his way from Dasht to Gawader.
29th:
Member of Organizing Committee Multan Zone of B.S.O. Azaad, Asim Kareem Baloch was abducted from Khuzdar.
31st:
Arif Noor Baloch was abducted by Pakistan Army from Karachi.

November 2010
1st:
Asim Kareem Baloch was tortured to death by Pakistan army.
2nd:
Demonstration held for recovery of Arif Baloch, while Police refused to lodge the FIR.
6th:
BNM senior member Naseer Kamalan is abducted by Pakistan Army from Karwat area of Gwader.
6th:
B.S.O.(Azaad) rejected police accusations against Sikander and Suleman Baloch, members of B.S.O. (Azaad). Both were arrested for having a book on history of Balochistan written by Mir Gul Khan Naseer.
7th:
Nisar Ahmed, brother of the martyred leader Rasool Bux Mengal was abducted by Pakistan army from Clifton, Karachi.
8th:
Protest Against Forced-Disappearances In Balochistan was held in London.
8th:
A shutter-down and wheel-jam strike was observed all over in Balochistan, in response to a strike call by Baloch Students Organization (Azaad) over abductions and killings of missing persons by Pakistan.
8th:
Conference on Enforced Disappearances in Balochistan was held in Geneva.
12th:
It was revealed that thousands of acres of land in Lasbela district belonging to the local inhabitants were sold to Arab princes by Pakistan’s army personals without the consent of the actual owners.
14th:
Tariq Taheer, the Son of a poet of Balochi language and a social worker from Tanzag was abducted by Pakistan army last night near Gwader at Zero Point.
17th:
Four bodies riddled with bullets and terrible signs torture were found in different locations of Balochistan. Two of them were identified as Basheer Ahmad Baloch and Sami Baloch. Two more bodies have reportedly been found in Mastung and Turbat who have not been identified yet. Victims identified as Lala Hamid Baloch of BNM Gwadar while another one identified as Hamid Ismail Baloch who is resident of Turbat. This was the day of Eid and Pakistan army claimed this to be the eid gift for Baloch nation.
19th:
Hasmat Ullah, Ahmed Ismail, Nasr Ullah Baloch were tortured to death by Pakistan army and their bodies were dumped in different areas of Balochistan.
20th:
Balochistan completely shuts to mark Balaach Marri’s third martyrdom anniversary.
23rd:
6 mutilated bodies were found near Quetta, and by dressing they were identified as Balochs but the bodies were not recognizable.
24th:
Shahnawaz Baloch, a BNM leader, was shot dead by Pakistan’s intelligence agencies in Ormara.
26th:
Pakistan army abducted BSO(Azaad)’s C.C. member Qambar Chakar along with his cousin Irshad Nasir from Turbat.
30th:
Three Balochs were shot dead by the Iranian coastguards near a coastal township in Iranian occupied Balochistan.

December 2010
1st:
Mutilated and decomposed dead body of Waheed Qambrani was recovered from Raje some 20km from Kalat city, he was abducted by Pakistan army.
1st:
Pakistan’s forces attacked house of a Baloch notable Ayub Ghichki, five innocent Balochs were martyred, namely as Murad Jan Gichki, Zubair Gichki, Hammal Gichki, Pullok Baloch and Sattar Baloch.
2nd:
Balochistan shuts to protest against the killing of five Baloch youths by Pakistan.
4th:
Journalists staged a protest demonstration in Chathar against the attack on Muhammed Luqman, a journalist by Pakistan army.
5th:
Pakistan’s secret agencies attacked religious clerics in Mashkay to promote religious violence in Balochistan.
7th:
Balochistan is the most dangerous place for Journalists in Pakistan said Gwader Press Club.
10th:
Relatives and friends of missing persons, including women and children, staged a protest demonstration outside the Quetta Press Club, and demanded that the United Nations and humanitarian organizations should take notice of the issue.
11th:
Baloch Student Organization (Azaad)’s (BSO-A) central committee member, comrade Qayum Baloch along with his friend was abducted from Gwader by intelligence agencies of Pakistan.
12th:
Complete strike in Balochistan against arrest of BSO (Azaad) leaders.
14th:
Strike against BSO leader’s arrest enters fourth day, while FC started a house-to-house search in Gwadar.
15th:
Political activist Rais Ali Ahmed Langou was gunned down in Kalat by Pakistan’s secret agencies.
16th:
Relatives of missing people announced that they would establish a camp before the Karachi Press Club to record their protest with humanitarian organizations. This was the fifth consecutive month of their protest.
17th:
Iran arrested a young Baloch blogger Ebrahim Hossienbor
17th:
Pakistan Army has threw five tortured bodies of Balochs in different areas of Balochistan. Bodies Yousaf Baloch and Abdul Raziq Baloch were recovered in Turbat, whereas bodies of Ibrahim Hasni Baloch and Noor Ahmed Baloch were found in Khuzdar, who were tortured to an extent that they were barely recognizable. Saifullah Bugti, another victim of torture murder strategy of Pakistan, was severely tortured and his body was found in Karachi.
18th:
Khuda Raheem Bangulzai was tortured to death by Pakistan army and his body was dumped on Sabzal Road Quetta.
21st:
Iran publicly hanged eleven Baloch dissidents. Names of those hanged by Irani Regime:
1. Abdolbasset Shahbakhsh s/o Allahdad
2. Abdolnasser Shahbakhsh s/o Allahdad
3. Abdolshakur Zangizahi s/o Hossain
4. Mohammad Saleh Islamzahi s/o Atta Mohammad
5. Nasser Shahbakhsh s/o Zaman
6. Lal Mohammad Shahbakhsh s/o Karim
7. Attaollah Rigi s/o Nazar Mohammad
8. Abdolrahman Naruvi s/o Khaleqdad
9. Abdolrauf Shahbakhsh s/o Shanbeh
10. Balanch Naruvi s/o Ali
11. Ahmad Naruvi s/o Abdolkarim.
21st:
Siddique Baloch and Yousuf Baloch were abducted by Pakistan army on their way home after appearing in a court in Gwader, whereas Ilyas Baloch was abducted from Coastal Highway Ormara.
22nd:
Protest in Pasni against abductions of Baloch youths by Pakistani secret agencies
26th:
The Baloch Students Organization (BSO) Azaad held a demonstration to protest the kidnapping of its activists and demanded that international humanitarian organizations intervene in the matter.
26th:
FC search operation in Quetta, 80 innocent Baloch arrested in Killi Qambarani.
26th:
Faraz Sarparah and Zubair Sarparah were tortured to death by Pakistan army and their bodies were found near Killi Qambarani and Shahzian Marri and Sohbat Marri’s body were found in Dasht area 20 km in the south of Quetta.
26th:
Political activist Latif Shahwani was murdered by Pakistan’s intelligence agencies.
28th:
Qadeer Baloch, Vice Chairman, Voice for Baloch Missing Persons, while talking to Business Recorder said that so far 13,300 Baloch nationals had been made missing in which 147 women and 152 children are included in this number.
30th:
Asa Zafar, a prominent political leader and ex president of Baloch National Movement (BNM)was abducted by Pakistan army from Turbat coastal highway.
30th:
Four More Dead Bodies Found in Turbat,victims included Mohammad Shoaib from Kharan, Attaullah s/o Dad Baksh from Mand, Naimatullah from Tump and the fourth one has not yet been recognized.

From www.sagaar.org: PDF
.
.

Click to access report2010.pdf

Pakistan: 2,531 incidents reported in three months, says report

Friday, November 14, 2008
By by Myra Imran
Islamabad

A quarterly report on the situation of violence against women shows a sharp increase in such cases during the last three months as compared to previous two quarters.

Released by Aurat Foundation on Thursday, the third quarterly report 2008 is a collection and compilation of statistics on the incidents of violence against women during July to September under its National Programme ‘Policy and Data Monitor on Violence against Women.’

Presenting the findings to mediapersons, Member Watch Group on Violence against Women Aliya Mirza said that 2,531 incidents of violence against women were reported during the last three months as compared to 1,705 between April and June and 1321 from January to March.

She said that in the third quarter, reported cases of abduction (601) were much more in number as compared to the first two quarters. “In the first quarter the ratio was 246 and in the second it was 356,” she pointed out.

Expressing concern over the increase in number of suicide cases, Aliya said that 216 women committed suicide in the last quarter as compared to 66 in the first and 126 in the second quarter of the year.

She said that the highest number of cases were reported in Punjab (1,582) with Balochistan ranked the lowest at 220 whereas 66 such incidents happened in Islamabad. She made it clear that if cases were not reported in newspapers that did not mean that no violence took place in those areas.

Aliya said that the most honour killing cases were reported in Sindh (70) with Balochistan (49) standing second. “Most cases of rape and gang rape were reported in Punjab i.e. 127 and 100 respectively,” she said adding that out of 441 murder cases of women, 242 were reported in Punjab, 129 in NWFP and 50 in Sindh.

Representing Aurat Foundation, Rabia Shah said that the report aims to identify the number of cases of violence against women in order to mobilise the social pressure against the menace. “This data would in the long run provide policy and law reform input to legislators,” she said.

Keeping in mind the sharp increase in number of cases, she demanded that the government immediately pass legislation on violence against women to provide them legal protection. “Continuous increase in number of such cases indicates that we still need to do a lot in this direction,” she said.

Director Potohar Organization of Development Advocacy (Poda) Samina Nazir stressed the need for developing a mechanism through which the data about such incidents could be collected at the district level.

“Violence against women is a persistent problem in Pakistan and around the world and it affects women’s social and economic equality, physical and mental health and economic security.”

thenews.com.pk

Violence against women on the rise

Staff Report

LAHORE: Violence against women has risen in the Punjab during the third quarter of the year (from July to September) and almost twice the number of cases of violence have been reported during the third quarter as compared to the second quarter.

As many as 1,592 cases were reported throughout the province during the third quarter of the year.

In the first quarter, 546 cases had been reported while 828 cases were reported during the second quarter.

These figures were disclosed by The Aurat Foundation at the Lahore Press Club, a non-governmental organisation working for the rights of women. The Aurat Foundation attempted to gather details of the cases of violence, however, they were denied access to the data as it was confidential.

Statistics:
During the third quarter
508 cases of abduction
242 cases of murder
127 cases of rape
137 cases of suicide
120 cases of physical injuries
100 cases of gang rape
95 cases of torture
35 cases of attempted suicides
31 cases of sexual assaults
21 cases of honor killing
13 cases of burning
eight cases of attempted murder
155 other cases of violence

In 439 of the 490 cases of abduction that had registered a first information report (FIR), there was no information available about the abductor.

An outright majority of the murder cases had been committed by husbands. In 67 cases of murder, there was no information about the murderer.

The representatives of the Aurat Foundation said that the only way to curb rising violence against women was to strengthen the role of the civil society in all spheres of life. They laid emphasis on the need to lobby female parliamentarians and women councilors to raise their voices in their respective houses.

dailytimes.com.pk

Pakistan close to bottom on global gender gap list

ISLAMABAD: The World Economic Forum (WEF) on Wednesday released the Global Gender Gap Report 2008 through its partner institute in Pakistan, the Competitiveness Support Fund (CSF).

According to the annual report, the social and economic empowerment of women is still very low in Pakistan and they are struggling for their livelihood and survival. Pakistan ranked 127th among 130 countries in this year’s Global Gender Gap ranking.

The report provides a comprehensive framework for assessing and comparing gender gaps in 92 percent of the world’s population this year. There are three basic underlying concepts of the report; it ranks countries according to gender equality rather than women empowerment; focuses on measuring gaps rather than levels and measures those gaps in outcome variables rather than input variables.

There are 14 gender gap indices, which focus on the economic participation and opportunities available to women, their educational attainment, health, survival and political empowerment.

Political empowerment: Pakistan ranked poorly in almost all categories in the report. It, however, fared better in empowering women politically, ranked 50th among 130 countries.

Norway: Norway leads the world in closing the gender gap, followed by Finland, Sweden and Iceland. Germany (11), the United Kingdom (13) and Spain (17) slipped down the ranking, but remained in the top 20. Netherlands (9), Latvia (10), Sri Lanka (12) and France (15) made significant gains.

Pakistan ranked 117th in both women’s literacy rate and workforce population, 115th in healthy life expectancy, 110th in enrolment in primary education, 60th in wage equality for similar work and fifth in years of a female head of state.

The CSF is a joint initiative of the United States Agency for International Trade and Development (USAID) and Pakistan’s Finance Ministry. It has been established to reposition Pakistan’s economy on a more globally competitive footing.

USAID’s support for the CSF is part of the $2.8 billion aid that the US government has provided to Pakistan since 2002 to improve the latter’s economic growth, education, health, governance and to reconstruct the areas affected by the October 2005 earthquake.

Staff report

dailytimes.com.pk

261 NWFP women subjected to violence in three months

Zakir Hassnain

PESHAWAR: As many as 261 cases of violence against women have occurred in the NWFP from July to September 2008, said a report released by civil society organisations.

The quarterly report on violence against women was compiled by Aurat Foundation and Violence against Women Watch Group in collaboration with Trocaire. The data has been collected from newspaper reports, hospitals (medico-legal reports) and two women crisis centres.

Aurat Foundation resident director Shabina Ayaz said out of a total of 261 cases, 97 were reported in Peshawar district, 39 in Mardan, 21 in Charsadda, 13 in Nowshera, 12 in Swat, 11 each in Mansehra and Swabi, nine in Buner, six each in Abbottabad and Dera Ismail Khan, five each in Chitral, Kohat, Haripur and Malakand, four in Upper Dir, two each in Tank and Lower Dir, one each in Karak, Batagram, Kohistan, Shangla, Bannu district, and Mohmand and Bajaur agencies.

She said the nature of violence was murder, head and body injuries, kidnapping, honour killing, suicide, customary practices (Vanni) and domestic violence.

According to the quarterly report, total number of victims in 261 cases is 312 out of whom 265 are women and 47 men.

The reasons for violence are family and property disputes, refusal to marriage proposals, illicit relationship, spying against Taliban, poverty, dispute with in laws, forced marriages, domestic violence, ransom and several unknown reasons.

Out of 261 cases, 210 were registered with the police (first information reports), 27 unregistered and there is no information about 24 cases whether they were registered or not.

It has been observed that most of the violence cases reported from Peshawar are from Urmar, Mathra and Tehkal, villages adjacent to the provincial capital.

dailytimes.com.pk

Violence against women on the rise

Amar Guriro

KARACHI: The cases of violence against women are increasing alarmingly and within the last nine months about 1,464 cases of violence against women were reported in the province, of which 229 were murder cases and another 220 women killed under the allegation of so-called honor, or Karo-Kari, 67 women raped, another 50 women gang-raped, according to data compiled by the Aurat Foundation, an NGO working for women’s rights. Aurat Foundation obtained these figures from shelter homes, women’s crises centers, newspapers and citizen action committees for women rights for the project “Policy and Data Monitor on Violence against Women” in collaboration with the Violence against Women watch group.

According to the Aurat Foundation data in the first quarter (January-March 2008) about 328 cases of violence against women were reported out of which 80 women were murdered, 65 women were killed under the charges of Karo-Kari, on seven women murder was attempted, 14 were rape cases and 10 cases of gang rape were reported, 24 women committed suicides and 38 women were kidnapped.

In the second quarter (April-June 2008) the number of cases of violence against women almost doubled and about 390 cases were reported. The data shows that 74 women were murdered, 55 were brutally killed under Karo-Kari charges, 13 raped and 26 were gang raped, 43 committed suicides, two women were sold and 71 were kidnapped.

The data shows that the second last quarter (July-September) of 2008 was the worst for women of the province and an alarming 746 cases of violence were reported. The data shows that 75 murder cases were reported within 90 days of this quarter.

The so-called honor killings or Karo-Kari cases rose and about 100 cases were reported out of which 69 were women and 31 were men. About 12 cases of attempted murder on women were reported, 40 cases of rape and 14 cases of gang rape were reported, whereas 204 cases of abduction were also reported in this quarter. About 46 women committed suicides, one woman was burnt to death, 14 cases of sexual assault and 40 cases of kidnapping were reported, 74 women suffered custodian violence and 55 women suffered domestic violence.

dailytimes.com.pk

Related Content
Gendercide in Pakistan: Women are a colonized population!
‘Violence Against Women’? No! GENDER-CIDE in Pakistan!
Women Slam Govt Against ‘Honour’ Killings

Poll on Taliban

Participate in a poll set up by:
FASTRising

We pose 4 questions
1. What should be one’s reaction to the Marriot Hotel bombing? This particular bombing is taken as a symbol of violence by non-state actors, though we are assuming that it was carried out by people in league or in sympathy with the TTP and other such groupings. We present three options:
Pro-Taliban
Pro-NATO
Or a new path, not beholden to either.

2. What would you recommend for a pro-Taliban policy?

3. What would you do for a pro-NATO policy?

4. What would you recommend for the third option?

Admittedly, the options presented here do not cover the entire set of possibilities – just those that the group could think of. If you have some suggestions to make (new option, even a new poll question), you can let them know at info@fastrising.org

The poll is open all Net surfers. However, there is an attempt to limit voting by IP address (one address, one vote).

Of course, it’s not foolproof but that’s not that big a deal – it’s just an attempt to gauge what the general opinion is.

Aman
CMKP Digest Number 1618

Israel: Aggressive campaign against secular women

By Toni O’Loughlin

24/09/2008
The Haredi sect has launched an aggressive campaign against the secular lifestyles of women in Jerusalem. (The Observer)

Four months ago in the middle of the night, six men dressed in wide-brimmed black hats, black coats, white shirts and black trousers burst into the Jerusalem apartment of a young Jewish woman and taught her a lesson.

Mikhail, who is reluctant to give her full name, had scandalised members of her ultra-orthodox Jewish community by leaving her husband and embracing a secular lifestyle. The men, all members of the theologically conservative Haredi branch of Judaism, tackled her to the ground, slammed her head against the floor and tied a rag around her mouth. One assailant sat on her head as the others kicked her while demanding to know the names of the men she was seeing.

They also threatened to kill her if she did not leave the neighbourhood, which contains many secular as well as religious residents. ‘A woman is only OK if she has a family, kids and a husband,’ said Mikhail with a sigh.

Welcome to the new, increasingly orthodox, Jerusalem. The attack on Mikhail, although exceptionally brutal, was only the latest in a string of assaults over the past two years against Jewish women accused of immoral behaviour in the city.

In relative terms, Orthodox Jews dominate Jerusalem to a greater extent than in any other city in Israel. More than 30 per cent of its Jewish residents are Haredi while only 22 per cent are secular. Of the remaining 47 per cent, 14 per cent say they are religious and 33 per cent say they are traditional Jews.

According to Menachem Friedman, a sociology professor at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Tel Aviv, the orthodox are imposing their rules more forcefully than before and the lives of the city’s women are becoming more circumscribed, and sometimes more dangerous, as a result. Friedman grew up in an ultra-orthodox family and has been studying the Haredi for 49 years. He said the extreme atmosphere is tangible.

Self-appointed moral guardians, dubbed the ‘modesty police’ by Israel’s modern secular media, roam Jerusalem’s ultra-religious neighbourhoods enforcing the voluminous and ever growing list of rabbinical laws such as the recent decree banning the sale of MP4 players. About 100 Haredi women have taken to wearing scarves and veils to cover themselves much like Muslim women.

Yoel Kreus is known locally in the Mea Shearim area of the city as the ‘manager of operations’. He describes himself as a ‘shmira’, a Hebrew word that translates as ‘watcher of Israel’. ‘I make sure the rabbis’ decisions happen … I help you to be a moral person,’ he said.

Much of Kreus’s time is spent checking out reports of illicit use of new technologies by members of the Haredi community. ‘If we discover someone has a computer at home we throw the children out of school,’ he said. Enforcing dictates on women’s behaviour is another vital part of his brief.

He runs a library housing copies of the enormous notices pasted on the walls of Mea Shearim and other religious neighbourhoods berating women for wearing wigs instead of scarves and advertising appropriate dress on buses.

Signs warning women not to enter if they are wearing trousers, short sleeves or a skirt above the knees, hang in the neighbourhood. One is affixed outside Kreus’s two-room house where he lives with his wife and 11 children. ‘Every week there’s a complaint about the way women dress,’ said Kreus.

Extraordinarily, he admitted to slashing the tyres of women who have driven into the neighbourhood who, he said, were indecently dressed. ‘There was a mess with the police,’ he said. ‘Now I’m trying new creative methods, not using violence. Now I make a small hole in their tyres and the air deflates slowly. I’m not destroying their car.’

Inside the Haredi neighbourhoods separation between the sexes is becoming increasingly strict. Husbands and wives socialise separately and during Jewish holidays men and women walk on opposite sides of the street.

Kreus said that in a few weeks, when religious Jews will dance to celebrate the receiving of the Torah, men and women would rejoice separately, breaking a 50- year tradition of the sexes mingling in this neighbourhood during this event.

He maintained that separation was necessary beyond the boundaries of the neighbourhood. ‘Having secular people on the buses is a problem. They go like animals, without clothes. Non-religious girls don’t dress properly. They encourage me to sin,’ he said.

With the demographics skewed in their favour, government authorities are acquiescing to the growing demands of the ultra-orthodox. The transport ministry, which regulates and funds bus transport through private companies, has allowed operators to provide ‘kosher’ or ‘pure’ routes, where women are required to sit at the back and cannot board unless appropriately dressed.

More than a dozen women have filed complaints after being verbally or physically attacked on the buses. ‘Sometimes it’s an official group but often it’s one or two men who start to complain and the other men follow,’ said the Israel Religious Action Centre’s legal director, Einat Hurvitz. ‘The drivers allow them to intimidate the women.’ Haredi women also participated in the bullying.

‘I was wearing jeans and a long sleeved T-shirt and as I was getting on the bus someone told me I couldn’t get on the bus like that,’ said Iris Yoffe who was travelling from Jerusalem to her parents’ home in the northern city of Haifa. ‘I ignored him and paid the driver.’ But then, said Yoffe, two women blocked her way and told her to get off. ‘When I refused they started yelling at me.’

According to Friedman, the growing intolerance is only likely to worsen. ‘They’ve built an imaginary idealistic world where everyone is pious.’ Increasingly, Jewish women in Jerusalem are required to conform to that vision.

21 September 2008

Source:
The Observer The Guardian

wluml.org